Complete design from material innovation to final product.

Terazzo Floors
































 

Interior / Exterior Concrete Terrazzo Floors History & Application:

The earliest record of cement Terrazzo usage was during the Roman Era. Terrazzo is a mixture of loose stone aggregates such as marble, granite, etc. mixed with a binder such as cement or Epoxy. Once the terrazzo mixture is trawled, dried, grind and polished, the mixture of natural stone colors and binder creates unparalleled esthetic looks that are desired through out the history of architecture in elegant floor settings. The majority of buildings date from the early 20's used cement terrazzo. The design and creativity of working with different colors and stone aggregates peaked during the Art Deco period. Many cement terrazzo floors built since the 20's, that had minimum to no maintenance still stands as a testimony of durability and beauty. Many Impressive Buildings especially during the Art-Deco Era used terrazzo floors for flexibility in design, durability and natural beauty, including The Empire State, and the Chrysler Buildings, etc.

In early 1900's cement production came in variety of colors. As such the mixture for the terrazzo color binder was always consistent. Gradually as cement manufacturers eliminated color choices and introduced color additives, Choices of colors without additives became very limited such as for example today the basic cement manufacturers produce "White", "Gray", and "Green" tones. Those developments made mixing of terrazzo colors a perfect science, Any changes in water/cement ratio would result in a different color. Any slight changes in the cement coloration, aggregate mixture, type of aggregates, would result in different terrazzo coloration. In order to be consistent in color, using the same mix on the job, at one time (one batch) was the ideal way to go. However on large size projects many batches were needed, so the key to uniformity in colors was the exact mix through out the project.

Working with cement as a terrazzo binder became challenging, and created many technical and design limitations. Since cement after dehydration shrinks and may leave hairline cracks, the terrazzo floors had to have patterns of "Diamonds", "Checkers", or other designs that limited metal strip joints to 3' or 4' size depending on the depth of the terrazzo. Floors had to be structurally designed to carry the extra +/- 25lb/sq-ft weight of dead-loads. Prefabricated terrazzo stairs, base-moldings and other terrazzo elements became heavy and very thick +/- 2". Repairing cement terrazzo floors became a hit or miss game, since wet cement after drying may have totally a different color and when patching, one does not know the color until the terrazzo mixture dries out and the terrazzo is grind and polished.

Cement terrazzo floors are still widely practiced in the terrazzo industry. Flooring with built in heating elements, or presence of water/moisture for dehydration lends itself to cement terrazzo, rather than epoxy terrazzo. Ideal usage of cement terrazzo is for exterior building sidewalks, vaults and patios. Rustic Terrazzo creates rough surface and exposes the beauty of colored stone/glass aggregates.

Interior/ Exterior Epoxy Terrazzo Floors.

Unlike cement terrazzo, Epoxy offers superior strength, waterproofing & infinite true colors (colors always consistent). Our terrazzo floors are on the high end of design combining unique and exquisite mix of marble, granite, quartz, mother-of-pearls, colored glass, sea shells, glass mirrors and infinite other material possibilities. We work with designers to achieve the desired look for materials used for the right setting, creating the desired environment. Our terrazzo floors undergo tremendous amount of sub-floor work to compensate for thermal movements, eliminate concrete cracks that can travel from the existing structural concrete slab to the terrazzo floor surface. E-poxy filler is used for floor leveling rather than concrete or thin-set mortar mix, and an elastomeric waterproofing membrane is used to buffer the terrazzo from the layer below. Basically our terrazzo floors sits on an independent rigid floor, regardless of the receiving floor, constructed out of concrete, metal-pan or wood flooring. A new hi-rise construction adjacent to one of our terrazzo floor projects on Park Avenue South, NYC, resulted in deep excavation and pile driving foundations. Our terrazzo floors survived the earth shaking pile-driving forces without any cracks, a true testimony to the strength, resilience and rigidity of our terrazzo floors. This type of work offers quality rather than quantity, making our terrazzo projects selective work. In recent years we have joint-ventured with other terrazzo contractors to assist in providing terrazzo components that are costly to pour and finish on-site. Such as cove-base, stairs, and terrazzo art designs, creating and leading a new era in the terrazzo industry. Durite is currently providing support and assisting terrazzo contractors.

Epoxy Concrete Floors™

Many designers like the idea of creating floors that look like concrete, but has the flexibility of epoxy for creating large sections such as 10'X10' metal grid, etc. Durite has perfected the use of fine aggregate Quartzite polishing and grinding. Quartzite are very hard to grind and requires special stones for grinding.
The end result look of quartzite epoxy floors are a uniform colors with large sections highly modern and stylized, seamless and crack free.
These types of floors have advantages of offering infinite true colors to Designer/Architects. Durite has applied this type of flooring on numerous projects ranging from high fashion designer floors to altra-modern restaurants. The cost-effective economical success along with high esthetics, uniform floor colors and ability to carry the same material to Table-tops, Bar-tops, and wall surfaces, no doubt makes this type of flooring the premiere choice of many Designers/ Architects in the future.